Tell advertisers: Drop Tucker Carlson

By Ann Daniels and Heidi Rand

Tucker Carlson opens his mouth, and filth pours out. Jokes about 13-year-olds being molested and violence against women who “act up.” Names and insults for women we won’t reprint, apologetics for forced underage marriage and raping prostitutes. And he throws a little racism in too … not to mention sounding like the world’s creepiest daddy next to Creepy-Daddy-in-Chief. It’s all there. But you know what else talks? Money. Tucker Carlson’s show on Fox has advertisers, and some of the leading ones are already trying to put space between themselves and him. Let’s work together to get more of them not just to speak up, but to put their $$ where their mouths are – or, rather, to take their money AWAY by refusing to sponsor Tucker Carlson any further.

What you can do:

  • Join the 13 thousand people who’ve signed the Women’s March petition aimed at Tucker Carlson’s advertisers – specifically, those with female CEOs. Women’s March also rallied outside Fox News HQ on March 13 to make their broader demand loud and clear: it’s not enough to #DropTucker. It’s time to #DropFox.
  • Follow and support media outlets and voices that don’t spew hate, misogyny and racism. Support their advertisers, and suggest they switch to sponsoring some of the below programs:
  • Pass this on!

#Drop Tucker graphic © Women’s March

Oakland Women’s March 2019: What Did You Miss?

By Anne Spevack

Like many other Indivisible East Bay members, I spent January 19, 2019 at the Women’s March in Oakland. The Women’s March is an inspiring and hopeful day where all kinds of people with different experiences and priorities turn out to stand – and march – in solidarity with each other. But for me, the reality of this year’s event did not fulfill the ideal of mutual support and solidarity, because the day’s logistics meant that some of the speakers – especially some of those from important, marginalized communities – were literally left behind.

The Oakland Women’s March organizers did a great job of scheduling a group of diverse, inspiring speakers, representing youth, immigrant women, formerly incarcerated women, women with disabilities, and more. One of the speakers I was most excited to see was Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter. Unfortunately, despite the great lineup, Ms. Garza and many other speakers never had the chance to deliver their message to the crowds that had gathered, for the simple reason that the march started before their time came to speak.

The schedule: The rally started at 10, and the march was scheduled to start at 11. At other such marches I’ve attended, times are approximate; the march starts when the speaking ends. However, at this year’s Women’s March, the march started on time, even though just over half of the speakers had finished their speeches. Thus, I watched 80 to 90 percent of the gathered crowd disperse before the last four speakers took the stage. And these speakers including activists representing some of the most marginalized groups represented at the march: Hai Yan Wu, an organizer for Asian Immigrant Women Activists, who gave her speech in Chinese; Stacey Milbern, a disability justice advocate; and Jennifer B. Lyle, the Executive Director of Motivating, Inspiring, Supporting and Serving Sexually Exploited Youth (MISSSEY). And closing out the rally was Garza, who had been advertised as one of the major speakers of the day.

Garza’s speech focused on the power of supporting each other across our differences. She proclaimed her support for her Muslim, immigrant, Jewish, LGBTQ, etc., sisters. Garza has at multiple times spoken out in support of the Women’s March, despite continued concerns about the intersectionality and inclusion within the organization and movement. I felt ashamed that most march attendees weren’t there supporting her and the other speakers.

I don’t think this was intentional on the part of the March organizers; I assume the rally and march were intended to be sequential, not to run over each other or to leave speakers addressing empty space. And a lot of attendees were there primarily to march, and left the rally to march with their group and not to snub any particular speaker. But impacts matter, and in this case the impact was a very visible lack of support for the speakers and the groups they represent.

Indivisible, the Women’s March, and other major organizing efforts have come a long way since 2016, building lasting movements, sparking national conversations, and trying to support each other in the face of our common struggle and peril. Let’s keep that growth going by continuing to learn from and support each other. I hope that we will be mindful of who is speaking, literally or metaphorically, and how we can be better at listening to their voices.

For another perspective: indivisibleeb.org/2019/01/23/oakland-womens-march-2019/

Photograph by Christoph Neyer

Anne Spevack is an expert on transportation and infrastructure issues with a passion for the environment, and is rapidly becoming an expert in the Green New Deal.

Oakland Women’s March 2019

By Ted Lam

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The weather cooperated for the third annual Oakland Women’s March on Saturday January 19; we even got a glimpse of a rainbow! Everyone who marched and lined 14th Street from Lake Merritt to Frank Ogawa Plaza projected positive energy. There were lots of families with kids, and all had smiles and danced along with the various bands in the march.

Indivisible East Bay walked with our good friends and partners in Indivisible Berkeley;  both groups marched proudly behind our banners. I believe we had the youngest Indivisible member (four years old!) participating out of our two groups!

Marching behind Batala, a great Samba drumming group, was like having front row seats at a concert. There was good music, energy, and camaraderie through the day and a lot of interest in IEB at our table. 

The Women’s March has become a major annual event for us to bond with and catch up with the groups and activists many of us spent the past year working with. And we’re all looking forward to next year’s election year event — the 2020 Women’s March!

For another perspective: https://indivisibleeb.org/2019/01/23/oakland-womens-march-2019-what-did-you-miss/

Photographs by Nancy Latham and Ted Lam

Ted Lam is retired from the USCG and currently works as a civil engineer. Ted is a member of the Indivisible East Bay Governance Committee and is co-lead of the Indivisible CA-11 team.

 

Join us at the Women’s March 2019

Flaunt your Indivisible East Bay pride by marching with us and our Indivisible Berkeley friends in the third annual Women’s March Oakland, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, January 19. This year’s march is co-hosted by Women’s March Oakland and Black Women Organized for Political Action.

Register here (free) to get updates and so organizers can estimate attendance. To march with IEB and IB, people will meet up at 10 AM outside the Oakland Public Library on Oak Street between 13th and 14th Streets (at Lake Merritt). Look for the red, white and blue balloons! Or find us once the contingents line up — look for us wearing our IEB t-shirts (and wear yours if you have one!), and for the IEB banner or signs.

Women's March Oakland, photo by Heidi Rand
Women’s March Oakland 2018, photo by Heidi Rand

At the end of the march — or if you can’t march but want to join in the festivities — come by our booth at the “Call to Action Alley” at Frank Ogawa Plaza!

Women's March Oakland, photo by Heidi Rand
IEB booth at Women’s March Oakland 2018, photo by Heidi Rand

These other Bay Area Women’s Marches will also be held on January 19:

And spread the Women’s March search link so people all over the country can find a march near them!

Read IEB’s statement about why we’re participating in the Women’s March Oakland, and why we encourage you to join us.

Featured photograph: Women’s March Oakland 2018 © Photography by Rex

Statement on the Women’s March 2019

As many of you know, there has been a controversy surrounding the national leadership of the Women’s March and allegations concerning their affiliations with people and organizations that have expressed anti-Semitic sentiments. Some of you have asked whether, in light of this, Indivisible East Bay will be participating in the local Women’s March.

The short answer to this question is yes. As we did last year, we will be joining with Indivisible Berkeley and other allies to march, and we’ll have an informational table.

The longer answer is that the Women’s March Oakland is an independent entity, with its own leadership; although the marches all over the country are coordinated to the extent that they take place on the same day, use the same logo, operate under the same name, and more, the national organization and national leadership are separate from the local marches. Women’s March Oakland responded to the allegations of anti-Semitism, as soon as they broke, by organizing a training on dealing with “antisemitism and other kinds of hate.” Their homepage states: “We categorically denounce and reject all forms of bigotry and hate, including racism, sexism, antisemitism, Islamophobia, homophobia, transphobia, classism, xenophobia and ableism.” Their leadership has never, to our knowledge, broken this vow. We at IEB believe that this is the right message and that it’s appropriate to continue to participate in an event run by a group operating under these principles.

Beyond this, we urge you to read this powerful Jewish Women of Color Open Letter for important and too rarely-heard views on how we can fight against anti-Semitism and other forms of hatred, and fight for women’s rights and human rights, together, without seeking or giving into forces that seek division. Without minimizing or glossing over problems, we also note that Women’s March national has stated as a Unity Principle: “We must create a society in which all women – including Black women, Indigenous women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Jewish women, Muslim women, Latinx women, Asian and Pacific Islander women, lesbian, bi, queer and trans women – are free and able to care for and nurture themselves and their families, however they are formed, in safe and healthy environments free from structural impediments.”

If you plan to attend the Women’s March Oakland, we encourage you to join us; look for our banner with our distinctive logo. If you prefer not to attend the March, we respect that decision, and we hope that you understand and respect our reasons to participate.

November All Members Meet and Eat

At November’s Indivisible East Bay All Members Meeting we spent more time eating than meeting. Several dozen members and guests gathered to enjoy tasty food and each other’s company for our potluck and post-election celebration.

November 25, 2018 All Member Meeting
November 25, 2018 All Member Meeting

We also fit in a bit of business — Governance Committee (GC) member and CA-11 team co-lead Ted led us in a round of applause for the momentous blue wave, and used the victories to inspire us to keep it up. Some actions Ted urged members to take were for now-resolved races, such as Mike Espy’s failed bid to win the Mississippi US Senate run-off election. And at the time the CA-21 congressional race was nail-bitingly close, though as we know now TJ Cox finally pulled ahead of Republican Valadao the day after the meeting, Monday Nov. 26, and by mid-day Wednesday TJ’s vote count had increased to the point that he declared victory! This race is particularly dear to IEB’s heart; many of us wrote countless postcards and canvassed for TJ, after our friends and allies in Team Blue Wave Contra Costa and East Bay for TJ showed us it could be done (despite the fact that the so-called experts didn’t think it was worth a try!)

Newsletter team co-lead and GC member Ann proudly read IEB’s statement endorsing CA-13 Representative Barbara Lee for Democratic Caucus Chair and announced IEB’s role in spurring other groups to endorse Lee for this important position. Sadly, Rep. Lee narrowly lost her bid for this position. We are deeply disappointed that her history of bravery, experience and wisdom was bypassed. But we remain hopeful that the new Chair, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, will be a strong supporter of progressive policies.

Looking ahead, Ted announced some upcoming events:

  • Indivisible National is sponsoring a National Day of Action on January 3, 2019, the first day of the 116th Congress. As Indy points out, this is our movement’s first chance to speak with our united national voice about issues that are important to us. On that day, IEB is planning to hold gatherings outside the local offices of our three representatives: Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11), Barbara Lee (CA-13, and Eric Swalwell (CA-15). Check the newsletter for further details.
  • The annual Women’s March is January 19, 2019 — check the newsletter for info.
  • There’s no All Members Meeting in December; we’ll see you at the January 27, 2019 meeting!

 

 

Pussyhat, Pussyhat, Where Are You?

If you’re an advanced beginner knitter – or even a beginner willing to try something new – you can make a pussyhat like one of these! They’re quick, fun knits.

Here’s an easy pattern for a basic hat, plus some variations like the photos above. There’s a pattern below for a star, too! (The “ROAR” hat is just a basic hat with letters cut out of felt and sewn on.)

Pussyhat pattern

You need:

  • Cascade 128 or similar bulky yarn, about 2/3 skein
  • 16″ circular needles, size 9 or 10
  • stitch marker(s)

Basic pattern, by Celia McCarthy of Piedmont Yarn, Oakland CA:

For this pattern you need only one stitch marker.

  • CO 76 stitches on circular needles (this pattern works well with a stretchy cast on method like the long tail cast on)
  • place stitch marker (PM) and join to knit in round
  • K2, P2 for 20 rounds
  • K for 20 rounds
  • Do a 3 needle bind off, weave in all ends

Pattern with insertions (triangle, heart, star, etc):

For this pattern, you need two stitch markers of different colors.

  • CO 76 stitches on circular needles (this pattern works well with a stretchy cast on method like the long tail cast on)
  • place first stitch marker and join to knit in round
  • K2, P2 for 12 rounds (can be more or less depending on how big you want the ribbed cuff to be)
  • Next round: K36, K2tog, place second stitch marker, K36, K2tog. The second stitch marker marks halfway around the hat.
  • Knit 2 rounds
  • Knit insertion (insertion patterns below). If you want to have the pattern on both sides of the hat, you will repeat the insertion pattern after the second stitch marker on each round. If you want the pattern on one side only, knit all stitches between the second stitch marker and the end of the round.
  • K all rounds until hat is desired length: total of 40 rounds or so
  • Do a 3 needle bind off, weave in all ends

Insertions:

Pink triangle:

  • Round 1: K18, P1, K18, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 2: K17, P3, K17, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 3: K16, P5, K16, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 4: K15, P7, K15, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Continue in this manner until you have 13 purl stitches*

* If you want to have the pattern on both sides of the hat, you will repeat the insertion pattern after the second stitch marker on each round. If you want the pattern on one side only, knit all stitches between the second stitch marker and the end of the round.

Pink heart:

  • Round 1: K18, P1, K18, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 2: K17, P3, K17, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 3: K16, P5, K16, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 4: K15, P7, K15, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 5: K14, P9, K14, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Rounds 6, 7, 8 and 9: K13, P11, K13, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 10: K14, P4, K1, P4, K14, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 11: K15, P2, K3, P2, K15, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*

* If you want to have the pattern on both sides of the hat, you will repeat the insertion pattern after the second stitch marker on each round. If you want the pattern on one side only, knit all stitches between the second stitch marker and the end of the round.

Star:

  • Round 1: K14, P1, K7, P1, K14, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 2: K15, P2, K3, P2, K15, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 3: K15, P3, K1, P3, K15, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Rounds 4 and 5: K16, P5, K16, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 6: K15, K7, K15, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 7: K14, P9, K14, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Round 8: K17, P3, K17, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*
  • Rounds 9 and 10: K18, P1, K18, pass marker, complete round with pattern or knit stitches*

* If you want to have the pattern on both sides of the hat, you will repeat the insertion pattern after the second stitch marker on each round. If you want the pattern on one side only, knit all stitches between the second stitch marker and the end of the round.